Resilience Through Resistance


coverAfAmOn this Juneteenth Freedom Day, I am humbled and honored to share with you a significant update in the Cultural Detective African American package. Since these materials were first published four years ago much has changed in the USA and in the African American community. When we initially asked its authors, Kelli McLoud-Schingen and Patricia M. Coleman to update the package, emotions were too raw, wounds too fresh, and the idea itself overwhelming.

“With each face, each name and each court case, members of the African American community see their fathers, their sons, their brothers, their nephews, their lovers, their mothers, their daughters, their nieces, and themselves. The fear in the African American community is palpable, present, and real—and it paralyzes, polarizes, and traumatizes the community.

A year later they sent us a brilliant piece that provides important and often missing or over-looked context to today’s realities of the African American experience. This short essay is especially useful for people who are new to the USA or who just don’t “get” what all the “fuss” is about. I am personally and professionally very grateful to these two talented professionals for their contributions to intercultural understanding.

“There are real values in conflict here. When someone is killed—whether by the police or another citizen, African Americans expect the justice system to work…

When this doesn’t happen, overwhelming grief gives way to unimaginable pain, which, in turn, often gives way to irrepressible rage. When the rage is released, the socially pathological stories of black violence are reinforced, perpetuating the stereotypes that serve to dehumanize an entire group of people.

What we have now is an opportunity to explore why African Americans have had the need, in every generation, to ask the timeless question, “Am I not a full and equal citizen?” It seems the answer should be an unequivocal and resounding “yes,” but the question is most often met with an appalling silence, or worse, a loud “no” backed by legal might.”

Cultural Detective, as you know, is a licensed product, available via subscription (CD Online) or printed PDF at very affordable prices. The topic of race relations in the USA is so crucial, however, that the three of us feel compelled to share the new addition with our entire community. You will find it below. Please put it to good use, whether in combination with your Cultural Detective Online subscription or PDF license.

2 thoughts on “Resilience Through Resistance

  1. Hi, Thanks for the best content. I have learnt a lot from here. Love to see more from here.
    I have also written about Stereotypes with explanation and examples. All i need to have your look on it and leave me a feedback. Here is the link to my content about Stereotypes: https://wp.me/p8x0ri-18

    Thanks,
    Have a nice day

    Like

    • Thank you for the work you’re doing to educate about stereotypes. I become concerned that repeating the stereotypes, as you have done, does more harm than good. Don’t you think it more constructive to help people learn to overcome stereotypes, to get beyond them? And to learn the difference between generalizations that can inform and then we learn individual, regional, socio-economic differences, etc. from there, vs. stereotypes that are not permeable to new information? I’m guessing that perhaps I do not understand the purpose of your blog post, so I’m misunderstanding it. Bless you for helping build intercultural competence, respect, understanding and justice in this world of ours!

      Like

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